Handy Mixture Bristle & Nylon Mix Hair Brush
Mason Pearson

brand: Mason Pearson
$175
$175 Previous price: $175

Estimated Delivery : Nov 11

You will not be charged until your order is shipped.

Return within 30 days if unopened and unused

Meticulously handcrafted and fine-tuned to perfection, Mason Pearson's Handy Mixture Bristle & Nylon Mix Hair Brush is the ultimate styling tool for medium to long, normal to textured hair. Spired tufts of boar bristles are set in a patented pneumatic cushion, providing optimum scalp stimulation and the smoothest possible results.

The Details

  • Premium-grade cruelty-free boar bristles
  • Flexible handle
  • Nylon cleaning brush included
  • Measures approx 8.5" L x 2.5" W
  • Revolve Style No. MPEA-WU1
  • Manufacturer Style No. MP HNDYMIX
  • Actual packaging and materials may vary. Please read labels, warnings, and directions before use.

How to Use

  • Brush hair regularly starting from root to tip to stimulate follicles and promote an increase in growth and shine

Mason Pearson, founder-engineer-inventor, went from Yorkshire, Northern England to London in the mid 1860's to work at the British Steam Brush Works, in London's East End, in a partnership later known as Raper Pearson and Gill. The business was in general small-brush making. The brushes were made by hand. Mason Pearson invented an automatic brush-boring machine to speed up the whole process of brush making in 1885, for which he won a Silver Medal at the International Inventions Exhibition in London in that year. In the same year, he invented the "pneumatic" rubber-cushion hairbrush. It took until 1905 to improve his technique, much of which was still required to be done by hand. His widow continued the business on her own for a further 20 years, when the next generation was ready to take its part. During this period, the decision was made to concentrate on Mason Pearson's rubber-cushion hairbrush. The product design used nowadays is similar to the original 1885 model with the improvements of the fully developed models of the early 1920s.